FCS

Surfboard Bag

Nearly all dings and cracks to your surfboards likely happen in transport, especially if your the type that throws a bare board in the back of your pickup truck. Protect your investment and save money on repairs by using a surfboard bag! Whether your heading down Voltaire street to sneak a barrel in OB or your planning a trip to Indo, South Coast has your board bag needs covered.

Day Trip Surfboard Bag:

When a quick coastal day trip is in order, the day bag has you covered. Coming in at a more affordable price than the world travel bags, day bags offer around 3-6mm of foam padding and sometimes a reflective side to keep your board from cooking in the sun and melting all your wax (hint: Don’t leave your boards cooking in the sun). Most day bags come in either single or double board capacities and are very lightweight and easy to fold up and stuff in the truck while you rip it up at that secret point break just south of the border. Padded adjustable shoulder straps are standard and a definite must for long hikes. Day bags are a needed step up from the board sock for everyday surf trips to your local break, as the added protection will keep unnecessary dings at bay and your rip stick in prime working order!
Dakine Surfboard Bag

World Travel Surfboard Bag:

When it comes to packing your precious boards away to hand over to the airline luggage destroyers, you have to have ample padding and rugged construction. A good world travel surfboard bag will have at least 10mm padding and some extra bulk in the nose and tail. Many of the larger “coffin” type bags that carry 3 or more boards will also come with padded dividers and internal tie downs so everything stays exactly the way you put it when you arrive at your tropical destination. For the minimalists out there, single board travel bags are available, but chances are you’ll hit a point in your trip when you wish you had extra boards when your single stick snaps on a reef or a possessive local. One of the greatest options available on the world travel bags is the rollerblade wheels making for super easy transport around the airport. Combine this with upgraded padded adjustable straps and you have one super mobile, ultra protective board traveling machine. (hint: A wheelie travel surfboard bag tends to be more reinforced in the tail section to support the rolling feature, offering your boards a much greater level of tail protection)
FCS Surfboard Bag

Surfboard Bag

K2.1 Side FinThe K2.1s are a high performance fin for skilled progressive surfers.  The K2.1 design is nothing new to the surfing world. F.C.S. has had these fins around for quite some time with minor changes in template and limited options for materials over the years. Slater has renovated his K2.1 and he ended up his ninth world title with them, that’s a successful improvement at its finest. We’ve stocked up South Coast with these things for that very reason.

The new K2.1s are made out of the F.C.S. performance core fiberglass construction. The performance core fins are stiffer than their natural composite brethren, you know, those plastic feeling ones that look like they could glow in the dark. Now they are composed of a foam core, a fiberglass foil and a satin cloth for aesthetic amusement. This translates to a less forgiving fin but one that is more sensitive and able to handle more powerful waves without sliding out or over flexing while racing down the line for a beach break barrel. They are also much lighter due to the foam inside the fiberglass foil as to not weight down the tail of your board when you’re trying your best Slater impression to get above and beyond the lip on your turns.

Almost all high performance fins now are made with some type of foam core but that’s not what makes these blue and white beauties stand out. The real deal behind them is how their templates work with the flex patterns of the P.C. construction. Most thruster sets have the 3 fins shaped all with the same template and length but not this set, hence the name K2.1. The side fins have more surface area compared to a shorter trailer fin, so responds like a small twin fin plus a trailer fin to balance out the pivoting.

The side fins have a wide base to produce forward drive through turns and allow you to slam your rail into a gouging cutback with confidence that the extra surface area will hold your line. They have almost no rake making them stand straight up like the dorsal fin on a shark. The lack of rake lets your board change direction quickly like snapping a more vertical bottom turn up a wave when you need to do work fast or risk being pitched via a heavy lip into a reef head. If you’re thinking right now that’s too risky, these fins aren’t for you. If you‘re drooling on your computer at the thought of such an opportunity, then you‘re on the right track to qualifying for a set.

The trailer fin is about the size and template of an M3 fin; there is a bit more rake, but less area so when you submerge your tail the board will go into a controlled slide or quickly cutback without sacrificing all your speed in the process.  The concept behind having a smaller trailer fin is to make it easier to break free from a carve and perform a more radical direction change, welcome to fins free surfing. Combine that with the responsiveness of performance core material and you’ve got a recipe for some heavy hitting Young Guns style wave riding.

These fins are not going to let you make a mistake without paying a price. They’re used by a nine-time world surfing champion, they were meant for those with the skill and the sheer guts to assault the most angry of waves at their most critical points. If you don’t set yourself up for a deep bottom turn you can expect these fins to make your snaps feel terribly forced and lacking of all style. They have a very pivotal turning nature so you must surf them more vertically and use more torque from your legs if you want be able to connect maneuvers.

Surf them in hollow beach breaks or in more heavy reefs in the area to understand how they work. Don’t worry about getting stuck behind a section, the side fins have the ability to drive you right around it with some double pumping or if you‘re daring enough right over it with a floater. Now you’re probably thinking these fins are too technical to be practical but it’s a double edged sword that will sharpen any surfers skills to their own benefit. Yes they’re not forgiving, but after you have them dialed in you’ll learn to execute proper bottom turns that produce incredible drive up the face while that smaller trailer fin lets you crank through a turn with style and enough speed to fire off your next blow tail snap.

Shop our selection of FCS Surfboard Fins Online

Packing your surfboard travel bag is an art. I’m not really sure how airlines manage to ding boards the way they do, but I’m pretty sure the ground crew gets pay raises for jamming blunt objects into surfer’s boardbags. Getting on the plane with the unknown of whether or not you’ll open your travel bag to freshly dinged boards is an unavoidable thought process for every traveling surfer.

Add in the ridiculous baggage fees airlines are imposing these days, along with the tanking American dollar that declines in value as it’s sitting in your wallet, and you’re arriving to your favorite surf destination with a sour taste in your mouth… And you’re not even out of the airport yet!

Not a good way to start a surf trip. The last thing you wanna do is spend time fixing dings in your board when you know you could have packed your boardbag better.

Reference the opening scene of Ace Ventura: Pet Detective for a visual of the way your boards will probably get treated once you check them in. (general idea)

Have no fear, South Coast has your back. Now view how we can all pack our surfboards for maximum protection against Ace and his co-workers: