Larry Ricci

Benefit Larry Ricci South Coast Raglan Public House

Benefit for South Coast Surfboard Shaper Larry Ricci

Please join us at Raglan Public House in Ocean Beach on Tuesday, August 7th from 5pm-close!

 

There will be drink specials & raffles all night! All donations will go to benefit our dear friend, Larry Ricci, who is recovering from neck surgery.

Don’t miss out on raffle prizes that include a Rip Curl gift certificate, a beach cruiser, Smith & Sun Cloud sunglasses, Wine Tasting gift certificates, Hodad’s gift certificates and much more!

Raglan Public House is located at:
1851 Bacon St.
San Diego, CA 92107

For questions call South Coast Surf Shop Ocean Beach: 619-223-7017

This board is my new favorite board right now. And that’s saying a lot cause my quiver is pretty solid right now. I have a magic little MR twinny, a magic bonzer that I love, plus all my fishes by Larry Ricci. I haven’t even thought about any of them this past week cause I have been on the Yucca Mofucca.

I was a little worried the board was gonna be too small for me. It is a 5’6″ x 19.5″ X 2.2″ and I am like 6′ 170lbs. I’ve surfed it about 4 or 5 times now and each session I am blown away by its capabilities. It floats different than a normal polyurethane board. Paddling it is more similar to swimming haha. The nose is real full and flat so it still gets into waves pretty easy. Once you get into one, that’s when the magic happens. Once your standing on the board, it feels way different than a standard PU surfboard. It has the glide feeling that people always talk about with wood surfboards.

The thing absolutely hauls ass and it releases off the top real nice with the twin fin setup. I love twins. I really like the twin fin/pin tail setup. I love my fishes (twins and quads) but all of mine have a really wide tail blocks, because they all have a super deep swallow/fish tails. I feel like the pin tail with the twin fin setup, gets rid of a lot of unnecessary foam, but the board still has the flowy glide feeling like the traditional twin fin fishes. Not having that center fin keeps the loose flow feeling fishes have, but adding the pin allows the board to surf more vertical and top to bottom… Then add the yucca aspect you it and you get even more glide and speed.

The Yucca Mofucca was shaped by Chad Jackson of Kaimanu Hemp Surfboards. Surfshot actually did a interview with Chad a few years ago talking about his boards. The board is solid yucca(agave) core, no foam. Instead of using fiberglass, a hemp cloth was used, with an additional hemp cloth deck patch. Instead of using toxic polyester resins, it was glassed using a less toxic epoxy resin. The fins are redwood twin fins handmade by Chad Jackson. I have been in contact with Chad the past few months, just talking about surfing and boards and whatnot. He is a super inspirational dude. He started his own clothing company too that is all eco friendly clothing and every product he sells, he plants a tree. Like I said, pretty inspirational dude. -Cory Edging

New South Coast Larry Ricci Surfboard

The Oompa was designed start to finish between one shaper’s desire to experiment with new templates and one rider’s frustrations.

First thing you should know is why this board was designed the way it was. I was tired of these oversized groveller boards that created tons of speed in average waves but refuse to snap a lip without having to throw out my back or pull a groin to do so. They tended to get stuck on a rail, so when the occasional section would steepen up there was too much delay to get the board to snap off the bottom in time for a tight top turn. I was also disappointed when in the presence of bowled out sections I’d have to wheelie my way down the face with flapping arms to stay centered over the low rocker deck. This effect was due to the tail and nose being too flat to allow a proper re-entry into the wave’s transition, rather than fit the curve of the wave’s pocket the board would stick out and force you to ride with all your weight shifted back or on your neck after pearling down into the flats. There were far too many cons than pros for me to ride these alternative boards much longer. Larry Ricci (South Coast Shaper and Shaper of my boards for over 3 years now) wanted to try and make something new so I shared my frustrations of current models with him in hopes of getting a more refined version of these trendy boards. We worked together on this one design for over a year doing our best to try and bridge the gap between the alternative weird shortboard and are typical fun-day ripstick.

My typical performance thruster is
5’10 x 2 1/8 x 18 ¼.

I wanted less swing weight in the nose so we chopped it down 3 inches. To compensate floatation we went 1/8 of an inch thicker at center and about 1/4 of an inch wider but left the rails thin to allow bite and precision in turns. This new design was 5’7 x 2 ¼ 18 ½. I didn’t want a flatter rocker; this board was meant to be surfed vertical in the pocket, not down a mushy line for a cutback. Waves, big or small, have a vertical pocket where a shortboard is meant to be surfed and this board was to be no different. The tail and nose are considered neutral in rocker compared to most boards but when you ride the same profile you’ve been riding with 3 less inches in-between the result is a highly responsive alternative shape.

The Oompa runs a fuller rail at the midpoint then tapers down to a knifed performance shortboard tail thickness. This allows you to flow the board through flat or racy sections with ease by having a high concentration of foam under the front foot. The harder you push down on the front foot, the more the board wants to squirt forward and ideally bounce off the bottom. The difference between the Oompa and these other alternative board shapes is the foil in the tail. The tail is just as thin as any performance shortboard. You can stomp your backfoot, submerge the squash with ease and pivot tight off the bottom to go for the sneaker lip that comes out of nowhere. The nose and tail kick eliminate having to wheelie back into sections or pearling down a hollow face. The shorter rail line lets you fit into corners your normal board might feel too long and clunky for during waist high windswell. The Oompa runs a very mild triple concave (A double concave between the fins which lies within a larger single concave through the majority of the board).

The template for the tail is slightly wider so adding that little spine between the fins lets the board transition more fluidly rail to rail; say goodbye to “sticky rails” and start nailing that last second closeout hit from each wave.

I’ll ride this board almost the same way I ride my shortboard. Let the wave build up to a wall in front of me, take a high line then drop it straight down using my front foot to force the thicker deck down the face. You can drive this board around a long section with a lot of pumping but it’s much more suited to straightening out into the flats and snapping off the bottom at a 180 for a quick lip slap. Don’t fret about getting stuck behind the section; the extra volume keeps you a bit higher above the water so upon reentry the Oompa can glide right around most sections that would otherwise cripple your length of ride. For the more progressive guys this shape has an insane amount of release, the shorter rail line translates to blowing out the tail and reversing turns your with the same effort of normal turns on a standard shortboard. Less mass to push around means less resistance, so start trying to surf above the lip since your rotations are going to spin a lot faster. If you surf with more power than tech start your turn a little sooner take some pressure off the tail in order draw the turn out from as much rail as possible.

Fin choice for any board is a very personal choice. It’s dependent on style, ability and wave condition.

My general rule of thumb with these smaller high volume boards has been to run bigger fins at the rail. There’s already less board in the water and without a bigger fin you’ll most likely feel a bit squirrelly when you try and hit the gas. I prefer the K2.1 setup in most beach breaks; the larger rail fins have extra surface area for more hold as you drive down the line while their lack of rake creates tight arced turns. The center fin is a bit smaller and balances out the extra hold with quick release at the lip, other fins that are of similar style from F.C.S. GAMs, AM-2s, and the newly released JW-1s.

What works for me however doesn’t work for everyone, so don’t be afraid to toss my advice out and try something completely different. Make yours a swallow tail, add a Vee at the tail, do a double barrel concave, toss some channels on and make it glow in the dark. That’s part of what the Oompa’s entire creation was about, stepping outside of what you’re told is possible and going for something you’re not even sure is there. Most importantly really talk with your shapers. There are a lot of untapped ideas that never get put into action as too few are willing to experiment, so next time you want to ride something different ask your favorite foam mower what they’ve been waitng to shape.

New South Coast Larry Ricci Surfboard Oompa Fabiano Sarmento

New South Coast Larry Ricci Surfboard

New South Coast Larry Ricci Surfboard

The Chub

by Fabiano on July 8, 2009

The Chub is a performance short board built to tackle small and weak waves. The fish was thought to be the ultimate combination of paddle power and turning ability but now modern surfing has a new board type that has been refined to claim the title of grovler board. The Chub is our version of that board. Much like a fish the Chub has a foil(placement of volume) that holds its thickness through the majority of the outline. Thanks to our lack of Northwest power this year all California shapers have begun to tinker with volume placement in hopes of maintaining a snappy board without sacrificing glide for mushy sections. Slater decided to take it a step farther by braving a 5’3 in overhead Indo but he’s Slater so that’s another story all together. The point is the new mode is to take your board, scrunch it down and fatten it up. The Chub is the final product of our own desires to still be able to do snaps and throw some buckets on gutless waves.
The Chub’s oval outline gives the board a lot of curvature in the rails. The curve allows the board to scoop from a bottom turn more easily than a parallel railed board (most high-performance short boards) . Think of a bottom turn like scooping out ice cream. If you use a knife(straight with little curvature), the scoop is more drawn out and ends up looking more like a long shaving. Now do the same with a spoon (lots of curve) and you’ll notice the distance it took to displace the same amount of ice cream is much shorter. Now before you stop reading and ditch this article for a pint at Bud’s Ice Cream the important thing to remember is how this affects the boards surf-ability. In small waves we need to be able to perform turns within a shorter distance because the lack of wave face (the height)  keeps us from generating the power we normally produce from our turns.  The curve helps the board come off the bottom sooner so you end up hitting the lip more vertically. This allows you to get more aggressive and perform the same big wave hits on smaller wave faces.
The Chub has low rocker and lots of thickness to get you in and flying through mush sections as fast as you can bottom turn. In a small wave board the last thing you want is to lose your speed between your turns. The extra float will help you maintain that speed while you draw your lines so you can really make the most out of the crumby days summer sticks us with. Where a normal short board fails to perform a vertical snap, the Chub can outrun the section, cutback, and finish with a stylish roundhouse. Rob Machado introduced the biscuit with the tagline “foam is your friend…” and if there’s anyone to take small wave style tips from its Mr. Smoothy himself, no afro required.
The Chub comes standard as a 5-fin option surfboard so you can adjust the turning as you feel required for the waves of the day. You can play with the fins however you like, be it thruster, quad, twin or our personal favorite at the shop the MR-TX. The MR-TX setup is a twin fin setup with a tiny trailer fin to help reduce slide on turns. This setup allows the board to skate up and down the wave smoothly while still maintaining all the traction on the bottom turns. The result is a very snappy board with tons of drive to plow through the most racy of avalanching sections which is why the Chub comes standard with this set up, but don’t let that stop you from getting creative with your own fins.
Sizing of this board is crucial because of all the volume. You’ll know you’re riding it too large when it takes you more than 5 seconds to be able to change direction or that its too short if one foot is on the nose while the other is on the tail. Treat the order like a fish, you don’t want to go too big or you’ll lose the turning abilities, don’t go too short either or you’ll lose out on the glide in weak surf. Try 4-6 inches shorter than your typical board, we have many demos available at our shops ranging from 5’2, 5’7. 5’10, 6’1 and possibly more to come. We encourage you to try them to better suit your surfing needs.

 

No, I’m not making up some weird name for a surfboard just to get your attention.  There is definitely nothing strange about the performance of this baby.  We continue our shaper series with one of South Coast’s newest board creations, the Chub.  Summer is upon us and shaper Larry Ricci has given us all a treat with this new design.  A board that will give one more performance than what you may be getting from your small wave shredder.

The Chub, as it is affectionately known, is designed for those surfers in mind that like a little more manueverability and speed than they may get from the traditional egg or longboard shape without sacrificing wave catching ability.  This board can also take the place of the fish, which also offers those elements as well.  The difference being, with the Chub, there isn’t as much volume as with a fish and can be a great transition from the short board design you might be currently riding.  It’s best heard from shaper Larry Ricci himself, so check out the video that goes along with this post. 

As with all of our South Coast shaped boards, you can demo the Chub at our South Coast Shops, free of charge.  A great way to test out a board before making the investment.  On June 20th, at Crystal Pier, all boards including the Chub, will be on display to demo.  To pick up the Chub, or any other surfboard that South Coast has to offer, stop by any of our five location in San Diego or shop online at southcoast.com. 

World Champion surfers, free swag, beautiful weather, and most importantly the chance to demo every surf board that South Coast Surf Shops has in it’s arsenal. Not just that, but you can also try out some of the best Rip Curl wetsuits they have in their surf line. The fun doesn’t stop there! Some of the great performance models of FCS Fins will be on hand for you to peruse. This sounds like a dream sequence that most people have before they wake up to screaming kids or blizzard like conditions, but on June 20th from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm at Crystal Pier in Pacific Beach, you have the chance to make that dream a reality. No really, our surf demo extravaganza will be a day you won’t forget.

South Coast surfboards have always been a main staple of the San Diego area, and this is your opportunity to feel American made boards beneath your feet. Everyone of our floor models from the longboard coaster all the way down to the high performance short boards will be available to ride and see what a quality made board feel like. Are you in the market for a board but don’t know what shape or skill level your ready for? Put those buying fears to rest. The sky’s the limit on this special day, where you’ll be able to test multiple models to get a better idea of what you might like to take home. Just bring and i.d. and all the boards are at your leisure. Not a surfer, but a fan of the beach? We have that covered too with some great swag giveaways and many extraordinary personalities.

South Coast is also honored to have surfing legend Tom Curren and current pro surfer Taylor Knox to share in fun. Tom Curren won 3 world championships on the world tour and his innovative surfing has inspired many future surf champions, including Kelly Slater. Taylor Knox has been a competitive surfer on the world tour, and is currently ranked 10th in his sixteenth season. Both surfers are California natives and great ambassadors for the sport of surfing. You might not be a big time surfer, but the chance to meet these amazing personalities will be well worth the experience. Tom and Taylor will also be ripping on some of the demo boards to show you the full potential that can come from our South Coast boards. Boards shaped and glassed in San Diego by Robin Prodanovich and Larry Ricci. Both shapers and glasser Mark Smith will be on hand to answer any questions about the boards and give you some great stories about their life experiences. If your still not sold by all this amazingness (yes, I made up that word), we will also be raffling off some amazing products from Dragon Sunglasses as well as Rip Curl goodies.

South Coast demo day will have a little for everyone. Don’t let the chance to try out our boards or meet some surfing legends pass you by. Bring the kids, your family, and some friendly strangers you might meet along the way. Mark your Calendar for June 20th from 8-12 at Crystal Pier, or come to the South Coast shop in Pacific Beach and they will point you in the right direction. We look forward to seeing you there!!

5’10 Arrowhead Quad Demo

by Fabiano on May 21, 2009

Spring has arrived and “what kind of board should I get for the summer?” begins to echo in surf shops around the county. Many have the archetypal debate of jumping on a fish or try to flatten out their current board’s rockers and add more hip area as compensation for the lack of size and swell power.

At South Coast, we’ve got Def Cons as the performance fish nosed short boards, old school keels, as well as modern Wing Quad Fish for those long slopped reef walls, Prod Quads, for fun looking beach breaks, and we’ve got a new addition to the small wave arsenal.

Enter the South Coast Arrowhead Quad. It’s not quite a fish and it’s definitely not your typical short board. Visually, it appears to be something one of our managers may have caught of the pier or an arrowhead you dig up out in the desert, yet despite these strange characteristics, the board performs exceptionally well in less than satisfactory surf.

This board features a rather narrow nose outline compared to most fish, similar to that of our Prod Quad or Launcher. This sharpened nose had that snappy light weight short board feel compared to traditional fish but still maintained surface area for small wave speed. “The low rocker and high volume rails let the board float higher above the water” said our shaper Larry Ricci. I felt this first hand as the take offs slide right down the face and grant you this vital burst of speed right from the get go. This, coupled with extra maneuverability from having less drag, allowed for smoother mushy wave foam climbs and close out floaters than any quad fish or hybrid fish I’ve ridden in awhile. [click to continue…]

Summer is quickly approaching and you still haven’t picked up that surfboard that will set you apart from every “Joe Six Pack”, and visiting tourist from Iowa. You’ve checked out our shaper series over the past few weeks and have loved all the great big board designs, but are still left with that desire to break free from the monotony of traditional summer shapes. Maybe you even have a classic fish and have ridden that thing to death. Time to take a look at a design so new shaper Larry Ricci just generated a name to go along with it. A board born by “accident”, the Arrowhead Fish is upon us.

Sometimes shapers tinker with current designs and end up with a shape that they think will rip. Often, in most cases such as this one, a board is created when a shaper is reproducing a standard and gets a little too crazy with the foam. Larry Ricci had this happen to him recently while shaping a classic fish model and decided to run with it. After a few of the South Coast shop riders took it out, they fell in love with this beautiful “mess-up”. As you can see it has a pulled in nose for increased performance and a wider double wing cut. Both of these features as Larry mentions will turn a classic into a speed machine. Perfect for many wave conditions and just a fun board to substitute for the egg or noserider you might be currently ripping on.

All South Coast boards are proudly shaped and glassed in the United States. With quality built into all of our boards, you know that they will last longer and hold up better than new “pop-out” boards, or surfboards that are shaped in China. Support our economy as well as the local surf shop and pick up one at any of our five South Coast locations. This board is available for demo, so try one on before making that big investment. Stop in at South Coast.com to take a look at our large selection of South Coast surfboards or any of your surf accessory and clothing needs. Check back in the future for more from our shapers and boards they believe you will love.

When you picture a shaper, what do you imagine they look like? Often a shaper is the “man behind the curtain” in the surf industry. Most people have heard of Rusty, Al Merrick, and Erick Arakawa when it comes to the big names in shaping. Amazingly enough, these giants in the industry only make up a percentage of all boards ridden in the U.S. The odds of you getting one of these gentleman to personally shape a board for you is pretty limited unless you’ve got an immense bankroll. Well Jason, where can we go then for an affordable and quality made surfboard? Wait for it……

As we’ve talked about over the past few blogs, you know that South Coast employs talented in-house shapers that will meet with you to shape a board by your specifications. Our “shaper series” videos have let you get an insider view of some super fun South Coast boards we have to offer. As I learn more about our shapers, I really start to appreciate their craft and passion for the sport. You’ll know that your getting a quality board and that it’s being put in very competent hands when your speak with them. Not everyone knows what shape or size is perfect for them, but Robin Prodanovich and Larry Ricci have been surfing and shaping for decades. This insider knowledge helps them to put everyone on a board they end up loving. That’s something you can’t always expect when you grab a board from the rack.

We’ve already met and heard from Robin Prodanovich about a few of the boards he’s most excited about. Now take a trip with me to meet another of our great shapers, Larry Ricci. I’ve personally had the pleasure to know Larry for the past four years as an employee at South Coast. Throughout the years I’ve learned many amazing things about his life and philosophy on shaping. Larry has been all over the world and has surfed in almost every possible wave condition you can imagine. Worldly experience has helped him to incorporate this knowledge into his board designs. Robin and Larry both transferred their love for the ocean and surfing into a successful shaping career. Larry started shaping back in the late 70′s and found that his friends loved his designs and wanted him to shape their boards. He was able to take boards from the big names in the business and take what ideas he enjoyed about their boards and mold them into his own shaping. Eventually, Larry was able to springboard his personal shaping success into a career working for some of the best board companies in the world. At South Coast we have been able to lock him down for the past several years. He has shaped more boards then one can count and has come up with some amazing designs you might have ridden already. Anyone who knows Larry, realizes that if you get him started on a conversation about surfboard shapes, your in for at least an hour discussion. Normally that would put anyone to sleep. His passion comes out though in these meetings with him. Someone who loves their job and craft so much has to make a quality board. Larry accomplishes both respect and admiration for those lucky enough to get to share a few moments with him. If you have a chance stop by South Coast and learn more than you would ever expect in a short time with Larry. Don’t let the long hair scare you away! He is one of the most approachable people I have ever had the pleasure to know, and he is happy to shape about any board you might have dreamt about.

In this video Larry will talk about one of his favorite models, the Wing-Quad Fish. The Quad Fish paddles like an old school fish but takes maneuverability to the next level. Single to double concave, cutwing, and quad fin set-up provide increased turning performance in a wide variety of wave conditions. Watch the video and really get a better understanding of what this board can do for you. If you want to learn more about Larry Ricci make sure to click on the link above for some other great articles and interviews with Larry the “Legend”. For all your surfing needs, make sure to stop in at one of South Coast’s five locations or visit us online at southcoast.com.

by Chad Wilson

As one of the more outspoken surfers in Ocean Beach, Trevor Nielsen brings a bit of color to the South Coast surf team. Born and raised in Point Loma, Trevor was destined to become the great surfer he is today. Excelling in both longboarding and shortboarding, not much can hold this kid back. After surfing with Trevor, I realized he has no fear of falling on any wave. Whether it is pumping six to eight foot Imperial Beach, or dredging sandspit barrels, he will go.

Contest wise, if Trevor can keep his cool, he could be a true contender on the Professional Longboard Association Tour.

Out of the water, Trevor spends most of his days either relaxing at South Coast Longboards, or out having a good time with his friends. So, next time you are in OB, stop into South Coast Longboards and meet the one we call T-Rex.

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